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406 Day 2018

Beacons Save Lives

April 5, 2018
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Full disclosure: I own several beacons, both PLB and EPIRB and know that my crew is safer as a result. I would no sooner leave the dock without a beacon, then head out without lifejackets, spares, flares, a fire extinguisher or a first aid kit. Whether you own a beacon now, or will be buying one soon, this post should serve as a guide to registering, maintaining and choosing a beacon. These are the reasons 406 Day is important.

406 Day 2018
. ACR

For Beacon Owners Today is the Day to

Check for an expired battery.

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Update registration

Make sure your beacon is properly mounted.

Test your beacon.

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For Florida Residents: You may qualify for the Beacon Bill discount

For Prospective Beacon Buyers, Today is the day to:

Learn how beacons work in general

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Learn the difference between a PLB and an EPIRB

How To Register a PLB or EPIRB

406 Day

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acr plb
. ACR

For All Boaters

406 Day is a day to Celebrate the Lives of those Saved by Beacons at the ACR Artex 406 Survivor Club, you can learn about the real life rescue stories told first hand, by those who were saved by beacons.

ACR Survivor Club Logo
. ACR

It’s also a great day to celebrate the bravery and willingness of first responders, including the United States Coast Guard, the myriad agencies belonging to the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators.( NASBLA).

Rent A Beacon?

Beacons can be rented from organizations such as Sea Tow Foundation and Boat US. This is a great option if you have not yet purchased your own beacon, or are renting a boat, or will be bringing new/ more crew aboard for an upcoming trip.

USCG SAR
. United States Coast Guard
Nasbla image
. NASBLA

Takeaway In 2017, within the United States and its surrounding waters, 275 people owe their rescue to the use of 406 MHz EPIRBs and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellites, which are part of the international search and rescue satellite-aided tracking system. This system uses a sprawling network of spacecraft to detect and locate distress signals quickly from emergency beacons aboard boats, aircraft and handheld personal locator beacons.

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