Five Great Cruising Rivers

Five Great Cruising Rivers

Rivers helped make this country great, and now make for great cruising. Luckily, you won't have to go far to find an inviting one. Check out the cruising guide selection at a site like Landfall. Or start with the five rivers that I enjoy most. - David Seidman

Five Great Cruising Rivers

Savannah River, Georgia
Put in at Augusta and drift 200 miles to the coast. Civilization seems to disappear, which is nice, except when you're running low on supplies or fuel, so stock up. The river isn't maintained, and there are no markers or charts. You're on your own.

Five Great Cruising Rivers

Hudson River, New York
Do this one in the fall as the leaves are changing. Ride the tide up for 135 miles from New York City to Troy. Then turn around and head back, or take a stairway of locks west to join the 363-mile Erie Canal and cruise the Great Lakes.

Five Great Cruising Rivers

Sanitary and Ship Canal, Illinois
One of our great urban waterways, built in 1900 to channel Chicago's sewage away from Lake Michigan by linking up to the Illinois River and finally the Mississippi. Things are cleaner now, and the run through downtown Chicago makes for a unique passage.

Five Great Cruising Rivers

Muskingum River, Ohio
The river is a tributary of the Ohio flowing 112 miles up from Marietta through manually operated locks. You do it yourself. By the fourth lock most boaters have figured it out. Make it all the way upstream and the Zanesville Yacht Club will give you a certificate; you'll deserve it.

Five Great Cruising Rivers

Columbia River, Oregon/Washington
Most of the river runs through a parched desert. But from the Dalles Lock (pronounced like "pals") down, you're suddenly in the Pacific Northwest of your dreams as you pass through the dramatic Columbia River Gorge in the lush green Cascade Mountains.