Tracking Great White Sharks With Ocearch

Tracking Great White Sharks With Ocearch

The Ocearch team has conducted expeditions around the world in an effort to gather more data about great white sharks.Ocearch/R. Snow

Tracking Great White Sharks With Ocearch

The Ocearch mothership is a 126-foot vessel that was once used for king crab fishing in the Bering Sea.Matt Boutet

Tracking Great White Sharks With Ocearch

Chris Fischer is Ocearch's founder and expedition leader.Matt Boutet

Tracking Great White Sharks With Ocearch

Matt Boutet

Tracking Great White Sharks With Ocearch

Tagging and tracking great whites takes a lot of equipment to do successfully.Matt Boutet

Tracking Great White Sharks With Ocearch

Matt Boutet

Tracking Great White Sharks With Ocearch

Cape Cod is a hotspot for tagging the Atlantic population of great white sharks.Matt Boutet

Tracking Great White Sharks With Ocearch

Multiple scientific procedures are performed in a short amount of time once a great white is brought on board.

Tracking Great White Sharks With Ocearch

Ocearch offers marine biologists from around the country close-up opportunities to study great whites.Matt Boutet

Tracking Great White Sharks With Ocearch

Matt Boutet

Tracking Great White Sharks With Ocearch

Six facts about great white sharks: A great white shark can eat 11 tons of food per year.
They live about 60 years but do not start reproducing until around age 20.
They can grow up to 20 feet long and weigh up to 5,000 pounds.
They have 300 teeth, but only 24 are showing.
They can smell minute amounts of blood, as little as one part per 10 billion parts of water.
A great white can bite with more than 4,000 pounds of force.
Ocearch/R. Snow

Tracking Great White Sharks With Ocearch

The Contender 28 Tournament
The Contender 28T is made to withstand the rugged conditions of offshore tournament fishing. Good thing. "That's the boat we actually fight the fish with," Chris Fischer said. "It's absolutely bulletproof." This shark wrangler is mated with twin Yamaha F300s that keep power in reserve for handling two-ton sharks. The boat has to be stable to endure countless hours of chumming at anchor, and nimble enough to zig and zag with the fish as the crew guides it, with hand lines, toward the vessel's hydraulic platform. How tough is it? Fischer once got caught in a Pacific storm and had to drag it behind the research vessel for days in 10- to 12-foot seas. "When we hauled it back in," he said, "it started right up as if the whole thing had never happened." LOA: 28'0"
Beam: 8'10"
Weight: 4,700 lb.
Deadrise: 24 degrees
Fuel Capacity: 185 gal.
Max Horsepower: 600
Matt Boutet