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Boating Is Adventure

Adventure afloat is where you find it.

March 5, 2018
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Boating Is Adventure
Boating Is Adventure John Linn

Uncle Roy E. is not a relative, but a friend who’s now long since passed over the bar. Roy loved boating and, at least to look at him out on the water, he was a fisherman. But not really. Roy was much more than that.

On any given day, you’d find Roy and his lady out among the fleet, a line dropped, trying to catch what was running. But if you idled up alongside and asked how he was doing, instead of recounting tales of the one that got away or giving you a count of keepers in the box, he’d just smile the biggest smile you ever saw and tell you: “We’re drifting and dreaming. We’re living the dream.”

Roy knew what was what.

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Our annual Adventure Issue, which is on sale now, seeks to present aspects of boating beyond the more common activities of weekend cruising, fishing, socializing at the cove or sandbar, watersports and so forth. Not that any of those activities, including drifting and dreaming, are mundane or to be diminished. They are common because they provide us with wonderful experiences and a break from our lives ashore, and once discovered, we keep going back for more. I’ve opined on this at length, as you can see for yourself at boatingmag.com/boating-adventure.

Read Next: 50 Boating Things to Do Before You Die

I wouldn’t want any of you to equate the production of an Adventure Issue with an abandonment of our commitment to keep you abreast of what you need to know to more fully enjoy the cove, the cruise, or simply a day of drifting and dreaming. That commitment remains solid.

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So, when you read “Cruising the Canyons”, Heather Steinberger’s account of taking her family to the otherworldly waterscape (the original Planet of the Apes movie was shot there) of Lake Powell, Arizona, you’ll find that — once past the spectacular photography by Heather’s spouse, Richard — this story is, at its essence, one of a family anchoring up and enjoying each other’s company while pursuing a diverse variety of activities aboard a small boat.

Quick Study this month is penned by charter captain, 100-ton master and author Capt. John Raguso. He outlines three first-aid techniques we think any boater should know, whether they ply the far offshore fishing grounds or never leave sight of their lakefront home.

In “Prepare to Dive”, Jim Hendricks details the boat features and accessories sought after by boaters who wish to pursue the sport of scuba diving. Whether outfitting your existing boat or in the market for a new one, this feature includes commentary by major boatbuilders and Patricia Wuest, editor-in-chief of our sister magazine Scuba Diving.

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We firmly believe that adventure afloat is where you find it. With this issue, we try to bring you boating experiences, techniques and gear to help you in the boating you do now and, just maybe, to serve as fodder for your boating dreams.

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