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Pursuit 310 ST

Fish, dive or cruise — the ride is one of pure comfort.

August 2, 2011
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Pursuit’s ST 310 is ready for anything. Plush, abundant seating ensures its success as beach ferry, yacht tender or cottage commuter. Amenities like the stand-up head, refrigerator, sink and convertible bow lounge make it an entertaining platform. Dive tank racks, plus a livewell, fish boxes and a complement of hidden rod racks, make it as good for catching fish as it is for catching rays and the envious stares of fellow boaters. It’s a great example of the new do-it-all boats.

Jack-of-all-trades jokes aside, the ST 310 proved its mastery of the seas. Busting through the inlet rollers, it settled into an easy rhythm as we made way in seas the VHF robot described as three to five feet. Into the waves, the ST 310 stayed on plane without having to go so fast that I flew off the tops, but also without having to slow down so much that I lost confident steerage. The ST 310’s head-sea ride is just right.

Then I set it to running beam-to. With its 24-degree deadrise, slim length-to-beam ratio and resin-infused fiberglass stringer grid brought to bear on the brine, I goosed the twin F300 Yamahas and romped along at a gleeful 33 mph.

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Could the boat take more? Sure. At full throttle it required a firm grip and steadying stance, but the boat didn’t seem to care. It pounded on only a few occasions, when an odd wave would lift one side prior to re-entry and cause us to come down on a chine instead of that water-slicing V. The ST 310 is a more able sea boat than a fleet of others I could mention.

It’s also quiet, and I don’t mean just the motors. Secured by beefy latches compressing thick gaskets, the ST 310’s hatch lids don’t rattle. And the arch/top doesn’t clatter or thrum. Resin-infused and cored, the top is lightweight, and its supporting pipe work is beefy. Of course, a good riding hull like this one keeps boat noise to a minimum by softening the blows.

Such excellent performance in rough water is the reason boaters in the market for a large sport craft or bowrider now consider owning boats like the ST 310. A good ride makes for a good time with less dependence upon perfect weather, no matter how you enjoy the water. And boats like the ST 310 are equipped to handle a variety of on-water activities.

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The deep circular lounge in the bow features shoulder-high backrests and enough space to seat six guests without knocking their knees. There’s stowage below these seats, and this includes a nifty set of folding rod racks. As suitable for mops and hooks as they are for tackle, the racks fold out of the way if the locker’s needed for bulk stowage.

The head is in the console and accessed from the bow. This makes for a wider entry, with a gentler slope to the steps than found in head compartments accessed from the side. And, because the ST 310 is a side console, its head compartment is massive compared with those aboard center consoles. In addition to the commode and sink, there’s a closet rod and an extensive stowage area here. Stainless portholes and a fixed skylight let sun and fresh air stream in.

At the helm, you command the ST 310 from a dedicated captain’s chair. Companions share a double lounge beside you. The black helm is nonglare and includes space for a pair of large touch-screen multifunction displays in addition to the complement of engine instrumentation. The curved acrylic windscreen — three-quarters of an inch thick — thwarts wind, and the hardtop mounted on the racy, forward-raked arch provides sun protection. Extending from the forward lounge to the seat abaft the helm, this top provides shade for up to seven seated crew members.

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There’s a refrigerator, a blue-painted livewell and a stowage locker for fenders, and fishing rods are located in the module that comprises the aft-facing seat. The cockpit is rung with bolsters and rod holders, and it boasts an acrylic transom door. Rinse your rods, sunglasses or swimming crew with the freshwater shower. The aft lounge is as comfortable for dockside entertaining as it is for a long run to the grounds.

Intrepid’s 327 ($215,000, nicely equipped with a pair of 300 hp Verado outboards) and Regulator’s 34 SS ($252,995 base price with twin F350 Yamahas) are worth a look before you buy. The stepped-hull Intrepid provides the convenience of forward access to the head and V-shape forward seating. The Regulator is a larger boat, with side access to its galley and head-equipped mini cabin, but its side console layout more closely resembles the deck plan of the ST 310. All three boats are out of the realm of direct size/feature/price comparisons. But for those seeking a boat for a multitude of uses with minimal compromise and outstanding rough-water performance, Pursuit’s ST 310 is tough to beat.

Comparable models: Intrepid 327, Regulator 34 SS

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_Click here to see the 310 ST’s accomodation plan._

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