Advertisement

Mercury Marine V8 Outboards: All Fours

Whether for repower or new installation, these engines rate high.

May 15, 2018
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email

We recently tested Mercury Marine‘s new V8 outboards at the storied Lake X test center in central Florida. It was the second time we visited Lake X this year, having tested Merc’s new V6 lineup of outboards about a six weeks prior to running the new V8 motors. These V8’s include new Verado and Four Stroke outboards; new Sea Pro commercial outboards; new Pro XS four strokes (which basically replace-or will replace the venerable two-stroke OptiMax lineup) and two new Mercury Racing outboard engines.

Mercury Marine V8 Outboards: All Fours
Access to the oil dipstick is just one feature you’ll discover when you learn about these new Mercury outboards. Mercury Marine
Mercury Marine V8 Outboards: All Fours
The author sets out with a factory captain to collect fuel flow data, speeds, sound levels and more aboard this 100 mph Bullet 21 SST powered by Mercury Racing’s new 300R. Garrett Cortese

Learn More About Mercury Verado V8 Outboards
Learn More About Mercury Sea Pro Commercial Outboards
Learn More About Mercury Racing 250R and 300R Outboard Engines
Learn More About Mercury Marine Pro XS Outboard Engines

We ran each of these outboards in single and multiple engine configurations aboard a wide variety of boats, ranging from pontoon boats to flats boats and from offshore center consoles to a 100-plus MPH Bullet 21 SST. Besides sun-baked, we came away from the test trials impressed by a number of features. Some examples include a convenient hatch in the top of the cowl that makes checking the oil level super easy.

Advertisement
Mercury Marine V8 Outboards: All Fours
Working out a 25-foot Forest River pontoon powered by a new Mercury V8 outboard. Garrett Cortese

Another feature is the Advanced Midsection (AMS), which, among other things, provides a unique engine mount geometry that reduces vibration considerably. We were also impressed by Adaptive Speed Control, which maintains engine rpm despite changing loads: run into swells or cut a sharp turn and you don’t have to ride the throttle as the load on the boat changes. ( Although you can switch it off, if you so choose). These engines offer the option of either digital or mechanical rigging, which, among other things, means these engines are excellent candidates for those seeking to re-power older boats.

The following video showcases a few more cool features. These can be controlled via the Vessel View screen.I encourage you to watch it.

Takeaway: “My escape is to just get in a boat and disappear on the water.”
–Carl Hiaasen

Advertisement
Advertisement

More Boats

Advertisement
Advertisement